How to use leftover cooked broccoli | Waste not

How to use leftover cooked broccoli | Waste not

The Guardian

.

.
.
.

Broccoli and other brassicas are so packed with nutrients, it’s daft to throw away the stalks and trimmings. Instead, cook them alongside the head, or turn them into a dish in their own right

Brassicaceae such as broccoli, purple sprouting broccoli and romanesco, which are all nearing the end of their long winter season, contain a compound called sulforaphane that is believed to have myriad health benefits. According to NutritionFacts.org, “Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli can potentially prevent DNA damage and … activate defences against pathogens and pollutants.” To reap those nutritional benefits, however, it’s best to eat the whole plant, fresh or frozen, including its leaves and stalks. Peel and thinly slice the thickest stalks against the grain, then cook alongside the rest of the plant, or simply eat them as a crudite. Purple sprouting broccoli, in particular, can have especially woody stalks towards the end of the season. Trim the base with a peeler, finely chop the most fibrous ends, and slice the rest in half vertically from the floret down, so thinning the thick stem.

And if you ever have any leftover cooked broccoli, cook it up a second time to make this savoury dip that also doubles as a pasta sauce.

Continue reading…