Clothes that last should become a fashion trend that isn’t just a passing fad | Rachel Cooke

Clothes that last should become a fashion trend that isn’t just a passing fad | Rachel Cooke

The Guardian

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Longevity is thankfully becoming more important than novelty

The problem with a lot of fashion writing is that it is just a shopping list fleshed out with adjectives. Its engine, noisy and restless, is acquisition. It couldn’t give a damn that the single most precious item in your wardrobe is not the modish dress on which you lavished far too much cash only the other week, but the square-cut shirt with a jungly pattern and buttons the size of dinner plates that your granny stitched for your mother in the 1950s.

But perhaps this is about to change. I sense the ground is shifting, and not only because of the pandemic, which has made sequins temporarily redundant and waistbands strictly optional. In Loved Clothes Last, Orsola de Castro’s new manifesto for mending, the words “caring for polyester” are written without irony. In Worn Stories, a Netflix documentary series, powerful narratives are woven from old coats, not new ones. My strong hunch, as someone who loves clothes immoderately and thinks about them far more than she should, is that fashion may shortly experience a correction; that it will soon have no choice but to consider longevity as well as novelty; that in the coming months, it will find many new and creative ways to deploy Diana Vreeland’s ever helpful edict “elegance is refusal”.

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