As a former teacher, I love a snow day – but none quite so much as this year’s | Romesh Ranganathan

As a former teacher, I love a snow day – but none quite so much as this year’s | Romesh Ranganathan

The Guardian

.

.
.
.

It hadn’t settled in any kind of meaningful way, but that didn’t matter – it was something new!

When I first started doing open mic nights, I had about five minutes of material. At a grassroots level, those gigs are horrendous – often in pubs where people didn’t come for the comedy, the microphone clicks on and everyone looks resentfully at fledgling comedians stumbling through their sets. The shows felt hellish to me then; but in lockdown, the memory of them feels like an impossible paradise. Now, I would kill to have somebody come up to me after a gig and tell me they enjoyed every act except me, just like the good old days.

An early joke in that five-minute set was about snow: “One of my favourite things to do when it snows is to go outside and pretend to passersby that I’m seeing it for the very first time.” It’s not the best, but it was one of the few gags in those early days that would always get a laugh, sometimes very quiet, but still infinitely better than silence. There were some days, though, desperately infrequent in England, when the joke would be elevated to legendary status, and that was when it was actually snowing. On those days, I would open my set with it: “Everyone enjoying the snow? One of my favourite things…”, and the audience would think I had done that joke specifically for today and give me a bigger laugh, not knowing I had cheated them. On snow days, I would get out of bed knowing I was going to have a gig that was indifferent rather than awful.

Continue reading…